Chinese scent bottle dating

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Please leave a comment below (for example: of why you liked the fragrance, describe the scent, time period or age you wore it, who gave it to you or what occasion, any specific memories, what it reminded you of, maybe a relative wore it, or you remembered seeing the bottle on their vanity table), who knows, perhaps someone from the company brand might see it.

Do you have a vintage perfume and need help in figuring out how old it may be?

Please understand that this website is not affiliated with any of the perfume companies written about here in any way, it is only a reference page and repository of information for collectors and those who have enjoyed the classic fragrances of days gone by.

One of the goals of this website is to show the present owners of the various perfumes and cologne brands that are featured here how much we miss the discontinued classics and hopefully, if they see that there is enough interest and demand, they will bring back these fragrances!

Sometimes a date is also stamped on the backside of the label, I have seen this with old Chanel and Lanvin bottles.

Chanel bottles from the 1960s onward should have the backs of their labels marked with a copyright symbol and CC.

Also, English Registry Design numbers can also be found on perfume bottles from the United Kingdom, you can search the numbers online also.

Old glass bottles might have etched matching numbers on the base of the perfume bottle and on the bottom of the stopper.

Batch codes are often found either stamped on the glass or the label.

In 1963, Brosse switched from making hand ground stoppers to precision machine grinding. Lucien Gaillard was a contemporary of Lalique and designed many Art Nouveau perfume bottles for notable French perfume houses such as Clamy and Violet.

In 1976, Brosse patented two new stopper innovations, the first is a ring made of polypropylene with horizontal joints placed on the stopper dowel. Julien Viard was a French glass designer of the 1920s and designed bottles for Richard Hudnut, Isabey, Favolys and Langlois.

This lettering is fragile and can be easily lost with cleaning.

Look for a patent number on the base of the bottle, these patent dates were frequent in the 1930s and 1940s, you can look up the number on search engines on US patent webpages online.

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